GOOCH STREAM COURSES


VIC166H1F
Common Vices and Neglected Virtues: Intro to Ethics of Character
Professor Paul Gooch
R 2-4


Vice is popular: a prestigious university press has brought out a series of seven books on the Seven Deadly Sins. This course examines such questions as the following. Are greed, lust and gluttony just bad names for necessary and otherwise acceptable instincts? What is the place, in a good human life, of such qualities as honesty, trust, civility and the like? Are vices and virtues culturally determined or a matter of individual preference? Can character be taught, or is it rather a matter of genes and luck?  Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC167H1, VIC168H1, VIC169H1, and ANT100Y1 /  PHL100Y1 / RLG100Y1 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)





VIC167H1S
Ideas and Fine Thoughts
Professor David Cook
T 10-12


This course examines how political and social ideas are formed and developed through literature, film, plays, essays and philosophical works in the twentieth and twenty-first century. Concepts such as justice, freedom, morality, existence and sexuality are examined and discussed in a seminar setting.


Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC166H1, VIC168H1, VIC169H1, and ANT100Y1 /  PHL100Y1 / RLG100Y1 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)





VIC168H1F
Identity and Equality in the Public Sphere
Professor Sophia Moreau
T 10-12


In this course, we will examine a number of questions about the moral importance of identity and the requirements of equality.  We will start with some philosophical writings about the value and sources of individual and group identities.  We will then look at the structure of equality rights law in Canada and will engage with some current debates about discrimination.  When minority groups challenge laws as discriminatory, part of what they want is to reclaim their identity: they want to be treated as equals, based on their real needs and merits rather than on stereotyped ideas about who they are.  So questions about identity –what factors determine it, which group members get to define it, and what the state’s role should be in protecting it-- constantly arise when we think about what equality requires of us.  Canada has in many ways been a leader in developing equality rights.  Our equality rights are viewed around the world as a model of how to treat people as equals.  But interestingly, Canadian academics, courts and lawyers still don’t agree on fundamental questions such what equal treatment requires and how equality rights should constrain governments.  We will look at these disagreements by reading both academic articles and actual court judgments, and we will try to think for ourselves about what it means to treat other people as equals without discrimination.


Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC166H1, VIC167H1, VIC169H1, and ANT100Y1 /  PHL100Y1 / RLG100Y1 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)





VIC169H1S
Ethical Living in a Pluralistic World
Professor Michael Bourgeois
R 2-4


Is it the end of the world as we know it? Who says it is, why do they think so, and what difference does it make? This course will explore influential religious beliefs about the end of the world, how those beliefs relate to different views of ethical living, especially in relation to contemporary political, social, economic, and environmental issues. We will focus on the origins and development of ideas about the end of the world in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam and the influence of these religious traditions on western culture and politics. We will learn key concepts and their relationship to each other (for example, cosmology, apocalypse, eschatology, millennialism, and prophecy) and examine various end of the world narratives and how they function to shape people’s moral values and behaviour. We will learn how stories can convey ideas, how to read and interpret various end-of-the-world stories (not only in recent religious and political events but also in late twentieth and early twenty-first century popular songs, films, television, and literature), and how to evaluate how those narratives shape ethical values and action in a pluralistic world.


Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC166H1, VIC167H1, VIC168H1, and ANT100Y1 /  PHL100Y1 / RLG100Y1
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

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