PEARSON STREAM COURSES


VIC181H1F/S
Events in the Public Sphere: World Affairs
Professor David Wright
MW 11-12


This course will review issues in contemporary world affairs, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to the present day. The course will examine the politics and practice of foreign policy decision making. Issues to be covered include the collapse of the Soviet Union, intervention in humanitarian crises, and the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC183H1, VIC184H1, VIC185H1, and a first-year course in ECO, HIS or POL 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)




VIC183H1F/S
Individuals and the Public Sphere: Shaping Memory
Professor Ivan Kalmar
R 10-12


This course explores how public service and citizenship are developed. Topics may include the role of law and government, civil liberties, rights and responsibilities, and the role of protest. Emphasis on individuals and movements that have shaped modern memory. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC181H1, VIC184H1, VIC185H1 and a first-year course in ECO, HIS or POL 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)




VIC184H1F/S
Individuals and the Public Sphere: History, Historiography and Making Cultural Memory
Professor Anne Urbancic
MW 11-12


In VIC184H we ask fundamental questions about how History is written. We consider your perspective as a historian of your own story, of that of your family, your community, your responsibility to citizenship. What will you include in your history? What will you omit? What will you change? How will you deal with your biases?


In order to begin answering these questions,

  • we look at historiography (the writing of history) from a theoretical perspective, with a focus on contemporary theorists including Halbwachs, Foucault, Marin, Said, Eco and others, 
  • we discuss cultural memory, or how any group of people share a history, 
  • we examine the ramifications of today’s highly mass mediated historiography.   

Then, as do scientists in a lab, we participate in two experiments: 

  • First, we examine the past by writing a brief history of a forgotten person or event, basing ourselves on primary source documents found in archives. 
  • Secondly, we choose events or persons from our own contemporary environment and study them, showing why they should become part of history yet to be written. 

Both of the exercises are guided, with ample opportunity for consultation. More importantly, your reports will become part of a permanent record that will be used by other researchers in their work.At first the experiments seem daunting. But students tell me that the two assignments turn out to be of great personal satisfaction, and that they return to the methodologies learned throughout their undergrad years and beyond.


This course will make you feel confident about doing research in places where first year students don't venture traditionally: archives, rare book libraries, the wider community. You’ll learn how to work with and document primary source documents (and perhaps you’ll find a scandal or even be able to correct an error that previous historical reports have repeated – both of these have happened in VIC184H).


Prerequisite:
Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC181H1, VIC183H1, VIC185H1 and a first-year course in ECO, HIS or POL
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)




VIC185H1F/S
Events in the Public Sphere: Social Justice
Professor Vic Falkenheim
R 10-12


This course uses events to discuss the nature of society including major revolutions, economic crises, and the impact of significant artistic, cultural and technological developments. Emphasis on our responsibilities towards social justice. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC181H1, VIC183H1, VIC184H1 and a first-year course in ECO, HIS or POL
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

Future Students