2017-2018 Vic One Courses


Please note: Vic one courses are restricted to their streams, and cannot be taken interchangeably. 

MARGARET CHAMBERS STREAM COURSES
Commerce, Management, Economics, and Policy

VIC186Y1Y
The Art and Literature of Leadership
Professor Alison Keith (Fall) and Professor Stephen Rupp (Spring)
T 6-8

What is a leader? Are leaders born or are they made, and if they are made is there a craft to being able to lead others? Through works of art, film, and literature, this course examines the various types of men and women who become leaders from natural-born talents to statesmen and state-crafters and individual entrepreneurs with the purpose of defining those qualities that make for the leaders of tomorrow.  Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC187H1, VIC188H1, ECO101H1 and ECO102H1
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC187H1F
Policy Analysis
Professor Bob Rae
M 5-7

This course is intended to be an introduction to the broad field of inquiry known as "public policy". We look at the ethical, political, economic, and environmental underpinnings that underlie debates and decisions in Canada as well as globally. The readings are intended to give students different perspectives and points of view, and the class also gives ample time for discussion. Participation is the key to getting the most out of this course.   Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC186Y1, VIC188H1, and /ECO101H1, ECO102H1  

Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred. 
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course 
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)



VIC188H1S
Corporate Citizenship, Sustainability, and Ethics
Wendy Cecil
M 5-7

Drawing together philosophical background with contemporary applications, this course addresses issues of corporate social responsibility, business ethics, human rights diversity and equity and considers how these topics intersect with a wide range of global practices.  Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC186Y1, VIC187H1, and  ECO101H1, ECO102H1 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred.  
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course 
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)











NORTHROP FRYE STREAM COURSES
Literature and the Humanities

VIC162H1F/S
Cultural Forms and Their Meanings 
Professor Ken Bartlett
R 1-3

This course will follow both the urban development and the idea of Rome from its mythical foundations, through the Roman Empire, the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Baroque to the modern city.  The richly illustrated classes will show the buildings and the sites that encouraged the idea of Rome and the shift from the pagan imperial to the Christian papal city which finally emerged as the capital of a united Italy after 1870.  We will learn how to “read” a city over time by following its growth, decline, structure and decoration.  Besides a modern text on Rome, we will read excerpts from various primary sources to gain an insight into how the city was perceived and how the “idea” of Rome came to form part of the definition of western culture. 

Each class will begin with a slide presentation to illustrate how Rome changed over the millennia. This will provide the text that we will “read” in order to understand how a village on a low hill overlooking a swamp became a metropolis of over one million inhabitants by the third century A.D. before declining again into a town of fewer than 20,000 until it rose again as a great papal capital and then a modern urban centre symbolizing the ambitions of a united Italy, the fascist regime and finally, today, a world city. 

We will investigate how this rich and complex history has benefited or hindered the development of Rome and how the symbols, infrastructure and even buildings of one era might be re-purposed in another and for what ends. By the end of the term Rome should be a familiar place in your mental geography and an example of how cities can be studied as repositories of collective, living history and culture.  Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC163H1, VIC164H1, VIC165H1 and 1.0 FCE in any 100-level ENG or FAH or PHL
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC163H1F/S
Cultural Forms and Their Meanings: People and Ideas 
Professor Anne Urbancic
MW 12-1

When we hear phrases such as “Break up”, “Break down” or “Break in”, we concentrate
on the verb. But where are the places indicated by “up” and “down” and “in”? How can a house burn up and burn down contemporaneously? What do we mean when we say things like “give me some space?” Where exactly is headspace? And what is the space envisaged by Northrop Frye as the castle of words that he mentions in The Educated Imagination?

In VIC163H we will study the ideas of some of the theorists who have considered the spaces of our language and our life, including Derrida, McLuhan, De Certeau, Virilio. We will examine how they posited our understanding of the concept of space: physical,
metaphorical, emotional, psychological, linguistic. We will consider how our highly technological and mediated world has affected the concept of space, and, with it, also the concept of time. We will work as a class, and in smaller groups, to show how these theories apply to our everyday lives, from the toothpaste we use, the coffee shop we choose, the stores we frequent, even to the way we view literature and creativity.

There will be ample opportunity for consultation and discussion as we:
  • examine theoretical perspectives,
  • consider how we practice everyday life, including in the visual arts, music, film, architecture, and/or local urban artifacts,
  • critically reflect and report on our own roles in today’s ‘global village’ (yet another metaphorical space), and our responsibilities to it.
At the end of the course you’ll be able to consider your personal and global
environment from several new perspectives. Be warned: former students tell me that they can no longer enter a shop, a theatre, a church, a hospital etc. etc. without being reminded of what they learned this course!!!  Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC163H1, VIC164H1, VIC165H1 and 1.0 FCE in any 100-level ENG or FAH or PHL
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


VIC164H1F/S
Ideas and their Consequences: Literary and Artistic Realms of the Imagination
Professor Robert Davidson
R 1-3

Recent studies have suggested measurable links between the reading of literature and increased empathy (Castano, Kidd 2013, Djikic, Oatley & Moldoveanu 2013). While many humanists have been keen to welcome this sally into psychology and even neuroscience, it is valuable to remember that the power of fiction has long been both a characteristic and subject of literature itself. 

Through an examination of classic and innovative texts by Miguel de Cervantes, Gustave Flaubert and Angela Carter, critiques by Milan Kundera and Zadie Smith, as well as cutting-edge forms of narrative such as virtual reality and games, we will explore the changing nature of fiction’s power. Works studied will include: Don Quixote, Madame Bovary, Nights at the Circus and The Art of the Novel along with assorted essays and alternative narrative forms. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC162H1, VIC163H1, VIC165H1 and 1.0 FCE in any 100-level ENG or FAH or PHL 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)



VIC165H1F/S
Ideas and Their Consequences: Isolation and Communion in Modern Culture
Professor Adam Sol
MW 12-1

A study of art, with a focus on poetry, as an essential mode of experience and knowledge, in the context of contemporary and modern society. Along with literary artists, the course includes writers on history and sociology and presents the interplay between artistic vision and socio-political situations. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC162H1,VIC163H1, VIC164H1 and 1.0 FCE in any 100-level ENG or FAH or PHL 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)










PAUL GOOCH STREAM COURSES
Philosophy and Ethical Citizenship

VIC166H1S
Common Vices and Neglected Virtues: Intro to Ethics of Character
Professor Paul Gooch
R 2-4

This course is about human flourishing – not about just scraping by morally, but about the habits of mind and action that are necessary for living well.  The virtues are those qualities of character that assist and enhance flourishing; the vices demean, detract and destroy.  We can’t think about every sort of vice or virtue in just twelve weeks, but we will discuss a few of them that inhabit one or more of three related categories.

In the first category are those vices that have, historically, been associated with our embodiment – the bodily vices of gluttony, lust and avarice, and their associated virtues.  We might think of them as personal, related to us as separate and distinct individuals, but they also have social dimensions.  The second category is the interpersonal.  Here vices affect our relationships with others.  We will consider only a couple of topics: lying and truth-telling, and forgiveness (whether relationships can be restored).  In the third category are institutional and civic virtues and vices.  What’s necessary for an institution to flourish, and for a society to function well?  Here we consider topics such as apologies and reconciliation, and the virtues of a good citizen – including respect for law, and civil disobedience.  Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC167H1, VIC168H1, VIC169H1, and ANT100Y1 /  PHL100Y1 / RLG100Y1 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)



VIC167H1F
Ideas and Fine Thoughts
Professor Andrew Lawless
R 2-4

This course examines how political and social ideas are formed and developed through novels, plays, essays and philosophical works in the twentieth and twenty-first century. Concepts such as justice, freedom, morality, existence and sexuality are examined and discussed in a seminar setting. The seminars will be organized around three related themes: Freedom and Absurdity; Truth and Politics; and Power and Oppression.

The first of these themes has to do with the ideas of Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus. We will begin with Sartre’s concept of freedom and the implications it holds for life in what he sees as a contingent world, devoid of any absolute meaning. Then we shall move to Camus’ more detailed examination of absurdity and nihilism in his famous essay The Myth of Sisyphus and his play Caligula. Next, we turn to the concept of truth (it turns out to be a rather slippery one) and its place – and its strength or fragility – in the political realm. Among the works we will read are Hannah Arendt’s famous essay, ‘Truth and Politics’, and George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four. Last, we will discuss some seminal writings on the topics of race and feminism, among them Ta-Nehisi Coates’ 2014 bestseller Between the World and Me and essays by Simone de Beauvoir and Germaine Greer. 

When reading, I want you to remember something people often forget: that the texts won’t tell you what to think about them; they won’t wear their meanings or their relevance on their sleeves, so to speak. The basic question is never ‘What am I supposed to see in them?’ but rather ‘What do I see in them?’ Not eligible for CR/NCR option. 

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC166H1, VIC168H1, VIC169H1, and ANT100Y1 /  PHL100Y1 / RLG100Y1 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC168H1F
Identity and Equality in the Public Sphere
Professor Sophia Moreau
T 10-12

In this course, we will examine a number of questions about the moral importance of identity and the requirements of equality.  We will start with some philosophical writings about the value and sources of individual and group identities.  We will then look at the structure of equality rights law in Canada and will engage with some current debates about discrimination.  When minority groups challenge laws as discriminatory, part of what they want is to reclaim their identity: they want to be treated as equals, based on their real needs and merits rather than on stereotyped ideas about who they are.  

So questions about identity –what factors determine it, which group members get to define it, and what the state’s role should be in protecting it-- constantly arise when we think about what equality requires of us. Canada has in many ways been a leader in developing equality rights.  Our equality rights are viewed around the world as a model of how to treat people as equals.  But interestingly, Canadian academics, courts and lawyers still don’t agree on fundamental questions such what equal treatment requires and how equality rights should constrain governments.  We will look at these disagreements by reading both academic articles and actual court judgments, and we will try to think for ourselves about what it means to treat other people as equals without discrimination. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. 

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC166H1, VIC167H1, VIC169H1, and ANT100Y1 /  PHL100Y1 / RLG100Y1 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)



VIC169H1S
Ethical Living in a Pluralistic World
Professor Natalie Wigg-Stevenson
T 10-12

How does the culture in which we live shape how we live in it? How do the scripts that shape our reality, the narratives that structure what and how we know, or the practices of everyday life impact who we are and how we act in the world? How does the daily act of living life in a particular context both constrain and produce our moral agency? 

In this course we’ll explore a range of theories regarding how culture and practice shape our humanity — who we are, how we live, how we reason, our common sense, our identities, privilege, power, freedom and agency, etc… — and vice versa: how do we also have the power to shape those same cultures and practices (and how do we not)? And we’ll do so in dialogue with our own particular moral contexts and sense of our own moral agency. 

Integrating theory and practice through reading, writing and discussion based assignments, we’ll seek not only to master a body of literature, but also to ask and answer questions about our own personal moral behaviour in the world. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC166H1, VIC167H1, VIC168H1, and ANT100Y1 /  PHL100Y1 / RLG100Y1
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)










NORMAN JEWISON STREAM COURSES
The Arts and Society

VIC190Y1
The Arts and Society
Professor Adam Sol
F 11-1

The artist, filmmaker, poet or dramatist has changed society and how we imagine our future.  This course explores a number of paradigm cases of how the arts have interacted with social problems.  Both historical and current examples of the role of the imaginative arts will be explored. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC191Y1 and 1 FCE in any 100-level course in ARC or INI or DRM or VIS or MUS or ENG
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)



VIC191Y1
Artistic Creation and Public Issues (4 Modules)
Professors DavidsonJagoeLeistner, Friesen and Robertson 
T 3-5

This course addresses social issues through the exploration of creative activity and the imaginative arts. Topics will be discussed from historical, ethical and philosophical perspectives, and might be considered either in a group or individually. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC190Y1 and 1 FCE in any 100-level course in ARC or INI or DRM or VIS or MUS or ENG
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course 

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)










LESTER PEARSON STREAM COURSES
History, Politics, and Social Sciences

VIC181H1F/S
Events in the Public Sphere: World Affairs
Professor David Wright
MW 10-11

This course will review issues in contemporary world affairs, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to the present day.  The course will examine the politics and practice of foreign policy decision making.

Issues to be covered include the collapse of the Soviet Union, intervention in humanitarian crises, counter-terrorism and the conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria.  It will also examine the impact on the liberal international order of the decisions of the Trump administration  Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC183H1, VIC184H1, VIC185H1, and a first-year course in ECO, HIS or POL 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)



VIC183H1F/S
Individuals and the Public Sphere: Shaping Memory
Professor Ivan Kalmar
R 10-12

The most general purpose of this course is to introduce the class to how public memory is shaped and how it functions in social life. More specifically, we examine individuals who have become iconic case studies of ways that powerful, rich, famous, or infamous individuals can behave in the public sphere.

Another way to look at this class is that it is a crash course on the essentials of western civilization, summed up through the biographies of individuals who influenced history in their generation, and through the way that such individuals are remembered by subsequent generations.  

Each hour of the weekly two-hour class will be dedicated to a different individual.

The readings come from a large variety of disciplines, and include both contemporary and older (as well as some really old) texts. Other assignments may be podcasts or videocasts.  Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC181H1, VIC184H1, VIC185H1 and a first-year course in ECO, HIS or POL 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC184H1F/S
Individuals and the Public Sphere: History, Historiography and Making Cultural Memory
Professor Anne Urbancic
MW 10-11

In VIC 184H we ask fundamental questions about how History is written. We consider your perspective as a historian of your own story, of that of your family, your community, your responsibility to citizenship. What will you include in your history? What will you omit? What will you change? How will you deal with your biases? What is the truth of history in an era of post-truth?

In order to begin answering these questions,

  • we look at historiography (the writing of history) from a theoretical perspective, with a focus on contemporary theorists including Halbwachs, Foucault, Marin, Said, Eco and others,
  • we discuss cultural memory, or how any group of people share a history, or how they refuse to share it
  • we examine the ramifications of today’s highly mass mediated historiography.

Then, as do scientists in a lab, we participate in two experiments:

  • First, we examine the past by working in archives to produce a brief history of a forgotten person or event, basing ourselves on  primary source documents 
  • Secondly, we choose events or persons from our own contemporary environment and study them, showing why they should become part of history yet to be written.

Both of the exercises are guided, with ample opportunity for consultation. More importantly, your reports will become part of a permanent record that will be of interest to historians and researchers in their work.

At first the experiments seem daunting. However, students tell me that the two assignments turn out to be of great personal satisfaction, and that they return to the methodologies learned throughout their undergrad years and beyond.

This course will make you feel confident about doing research in places where first year students don't venture traditionally: archives, rare book libraries, the wider community. You’ll learn how to work with and document primary sources (and perhaps you’ll solve a mystery or even be able to correct an error that previous historical reports have repeated– both of these have happened in VIC184H).  Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC181H1, VIC183H1, VIC185H1 and a first-year course in ECO, HIS or POL
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)



VIC185H1F/S
Events in the Public Sphere: Social Justice
Professor Vic Falkenheim
R 10-12

This course uses events to discuss the nature of society including major revolutions, economic crises, and the impact of significant artistic, cultural and technological developments. Emphasis on our responsibilities towards social justice. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC181H1, VIC183H1, VIC184H1 and a first-year course in ECO, HIS or POL
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)










EGERTON RYERSON STREAM COURSES
Education and Society

VIC150Y1
School and Society
Professor Yiola Cleovoulou
M 10-12

By the end of the course students will have demonstrated their ability to critically examine how society, schooling and education are interconnected.  The course is divided into 4 sections and together, through discussion, readings, group presentations, and small group explorations we will unpack significant issues in school and society. 

The four sections are: 

1.History of Education: understanding key aspects of Ontario’s schooling history

2.Knowledge Production: understanding where and who produces knowledge 

3.Policy and Education: identifying and exploring policies in Ontario education and their effects on schooling

4.Politics and Education: exploring aspects of education that our of interest to us and understand the politics around them (how they play out in schools today)

Students are encouraged to explore their own schooling experiences and how their historical experiences may shape the future teaching practices and perspectives. The small class size makes discussions and sharing a wonderful and productive experience!

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC151Y1 and PSY100H1
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)



VIC151Y1
Theories and Practices of Teaching
Professor Sheila Cook (Fall) and TBA (Spring)
TR 10-11

This course focuses on connecting theories and practice of teaching with a view to having students develop their personal understanding of teaching. Students will be involved in a practicum. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC150Y1 and PSY100H1
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course 

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)










ARTHUR SCHAWLOW STREAM COURSES
Physical and Mathematical Sciences

VIC172Y1
Physical Sciences Today
Professor Emanuel Istrate
W 2-4

What does science do for our society, and what does society do for science? Who are today’s scientists? Why, where and how are they doing their work? In this course we discuss the way science works, taking a multi-disciplinary look at the physical sciences, the factors that enable scientific progress and the environment in which we advance science today.  

We will look at the norms guiding the work of scientists, the value of scientific results and the ways in which scientists and others make use of these results to improve our lives. At the same time, we discuss our social and ethical responsibilities as scientists. The course complements the content of the science courses taught at the university, discussing issues that modern scientists should consider. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC173Y1 and 1.0 FCE selected from first-year course offerings in the sciences (0.5 FCE must be a PHY, MAT or CHM course)
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science or Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)



VIC173Y1
Philosophy of Science for Physical Scientists
Professor Joseph Berkovitz
F 2-4

This course introduces students to some of the issues in the philosophy of science, in general, and in the philosophy of physics, in particular. Topics include the scientific method and its controversies, the meaning of time and its properties, realism versus competing approaches, thought experiments, and quantum mechanics. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC172Y1 and 1.0 FCE selected from first-year course offerings in the sciences (0.5 FCE must be a PHY, MAT or CHM course)
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science or Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)










AUGUSTA STOWE-GULLEN STREAM COURSES
Life Sciences

VIC170Y1
Introduction to Probability, Persuasion and the Rhetoric of Science
Professor Paul Corey and Professor Andrew Baines
TR 10-12

Alternate facts?  Or scientific probabilities?  One person’s observations, explanations and predictions are not science until communicated to others who reproduce the observations and build on the explanations.    Rhetoric, the art of persuasion, offers time-tested effective ways to convey a compelling message to a specific target audience.  Scientists must tell convincing stories grounded in reproducible observations that are explained and enriched with metaphors, analogies and other rhetorical tools.  Statistical analysis is one of those important tools.

Effective story telling, whatever the subject matter may be, requires you to understand your audience, its values, interests and language.  In this course you will address several audiences using the appropriate rhetoric to persuade:

  • anti-vaccination proponents to accept vaccination; 
  • a literate audience to accept your interpretations of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Issac Azimov’s Bicentennial Man;
  • an educated lay-audience to become curious and raise questions about your brief oral description of a current research topic; 
  • a skeptical and empowered audience to act on your risk-analysis and recommendations;
  • specialist scientists to support your original research grant proposal. 

This last assignment challenges you to attain the level expected of a graduate student. You will be helped with the research topic by a scientist-mentor doing research in the area of science you have chosen.    

Life is full of risks – some that science can help reduce and others that science creates.  We will explore polices that deal with risk, human error and associated ethical issues. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC171Y1 and 1.0 FCE selected from first-year course offerings in the sciences (0.5 FCE must be a BIO course)
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)



VIC171Y1
Methodology, Theory and Practice in the Natural Sciences
Professor Brian Baigrie
TR 12-1 

An examination of scientific theories and their logic in life and physical sciences.  Experimental design, novel device production, data analysis and modeling will be discussed using examples drawn from primary source material in the natural sciences.  Students will prepare a research paper on a topic designed in consultation with the instructor. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC170Y1 and 1.0 FCE selected from first-year course offerings in the sciences (0.5 FCE must be a BIO course)
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)









Future Students