The Taking, Killing, and Destroying of Deer

The Northrop Frye Centre Presents:

The Taking, Killing, and Destroying of Deer

Masculinity, Trespass, and Poaching in Seventeenth-Century England
The Taking, Killing, and Destroying of Deer; April 5 2016

The Taking, Killing, and Destroying of Deer; April 5 2016

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Tuesday, April 5, 2016 at 1:00PM

Alexandra Logue, NFC Doctoral Fellow
Northrop Frye Centre (VC102), Old Victoria College Building
(91 Charles Street West)

In early modern England, hunting was a “princely and royal chase” that “conferred exceeding grace unto a Huntsman.” But English courts were full of cases against gangs of men who poached deer and other animals from the King’s forests. Poachers challenged the potent symbols of masculinity and honour that were integral to the ritualized violence of the hunt. This paper examines the relationship between masculinity, power, and control over property in the rural landscapes of seventeenth-century England, and analyzes how, in cases of unlawful hunting, violence against animals symbolized violence against the King.

Alexandra Logue is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History, focusing on gender and space in early modern England. Her dissertation explores the intersections of masculinity, domesticity, and violence in urban London, and in rural communities outside the city. 

Academics