Courses 2017-18


IVP210H1-S  
Holography for 3D Visualization
Professor Emanuel Istrate
Lecture: T 9-11
Practicum: T 4-7; R 9-12


What kinds of skills does it take to make holograms? It actually takes both science and art if you want to have a hologram that is technically successful and also artistically meaningful. This course teaches both art and science to students with very diverse backgrounds in the arts, sciences, and anything else. We take a very hands-on approach, working in the University’s holography studio located at the Impact Centre. While making holograms, we explain the physical processes at play. In the two projects, students work in teams to create artistically valuable holograms that will be presented to the rest of the class. On the science side, after we explain the optics of holography, we also survey other places where optical physics gets used. As we combine both art and science, the course is aimed at students from any discipline. 

Prerequisite: Application required.

Exclusion: JOP210H1

Distribution Requirement: Science

Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)





VIC271H1-S  
Reading the Wild
Professor John Bemrose
W 2-4


In light of the environmental crisis, this seminar surveys a wide range of oral and written literature in order to discover how our approach to nature has changed over the centuries, what gains and losses have attended modernity, and what older cultures can teach us as we seek to preserve threatened ecosystems.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)




VIC275H1-F  
Creative Writing: Short Fiction
Professor John Bemrose
W 2-4


This course is for aspiring fiction writers who wish to deepen their craft.  Each seminar will feature a lecture on technical issues such as plot and characterization, as well as an analysis of a short story by a classic writer. Students will write their own stories, with editorial input from the instructor.  


Prerequisite: Application Required. Deadline to apply is July 1st, 2017.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)





VIC275H1-S

Creative Writing: Short Fiction
Professor Camilla Gibb
T 2-4


This course is for aspiring fiction writers who wish to deepen their craft.  Each seminar will feature a lecture on technical issues such as plot and characterization, as well as an analysis of a short story by a classic writer. Students will write their own stories, with editorial input from the instructor.  


Prerequisite: Application Required.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)




VIC279H1-F 
Creative Non-Fiction
Professor Lisa Khoo
M 6-8


This course examines the forms, style, aims, and ethics of non-fictional forms such as documentary writing, journalism, and life-writing. It combines the study of examples from contemporary media with exercises in writing non-fictional prose.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)




VIC280H1-F  
Creative Writing: Poetry
Professor Bruce Meyer
R 6-8


A workshop course (with a literature component) in writing poetry. Designed for those with a serious ambition to be writers as evinced in work they are already doing. The literature component emphasizes multicultural dimensions of contemporary writing in English. 


Prerequisite: Application required
Exclusion: VIC350Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)




VIC281H1-F   
Popular Music, Technology and the Human 
Professor Ken McLeod
R 1-3


This course explores ways in which popular music, sound and sound technologies have influenced our understanding of the recent human condition. Drawing on a variety of theoretical perspectives, we consider the musical uses of technology as both a material culture and a set of distinctly innovative practices that can create powerful transformations of consciousness, meaning and value. 

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)




VIC350Y1-Y  
Creative Writing
Professor David Gilmour
T 11-1


Reading a lot may be helpful for a young writer but it’s not a replacement for the real thing, for the act of writing. So, we will not load you down with a ton of reading – I think that's a waste of the limited time we have together. But I will demand instead a rigorous output of prose. Regardless of what literary era you find yourself in, the trick to good writing is a good story. Pretty sentences strung together like Christmas lights won’t cut it on their own. Eventually the reader can smell a rat. A story must compel you to ask: "And then what happened?" We are going to write stories of a realistic nature, stories that don't necessarily have to have happened, but must be able to have happened. (If you are a lover of fantasy or sci-fi or magic realism,this class is not for you.) 

We are going to write and cut and rewrite and cut and rewrite some more. Do you get the picture? 2,000 words a week, week in,week out, 40, 000 words at year's end -- until the act of writing becomes an automatic reflex rather like that of an athlete going to the gym daily, even in the off season. I want to get you published. Remember this please: good writing involves the darkening of hundreds and hundreds of pages, usually badly, until you write a good one. Then you’re on your way. This is a serious course; tourists not invited. If in doubt about just how serious, try and talk to someone who has taken either my courses before. 

Prerequisite: Application Required. Preference given to fourth and third-year students.
Exclusion: VIC280H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)




VIC372H1-F  
Reviewing, Reception, and Reading Communities
Professor Heather Murray
W 10-12


While readers and audiences often are considered to be cultural "consumers," this course will consider reception as an active, creative, and often collaborative activity, by examining formal and informal practices of reviewing and response that may include fan/fanfic cultures, book clubs, community and nation-wide reading programs, and award competitions. Such contexts of reception will be considered along with their social, economic, and ethical implications.


Prerequisite: Completion of 6.0 FCE
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)




VIC470H1-F
Soundscapes
Professor Sherry Lee
TR 10-12


This course surveys the growth of the field of Acoustic Ecology and the aesthetic, political, and ethical questions it engages. Students learn about creative and musical practices associated with this new attention to sound, and they gain experience with the practice of field recording and sonic-environmental sampling. The course culminates with a final Soundscape composition or creative mapping project. No previous experience in sound recording or composition required.



Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 FCE
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC479Y1-Y  
The Novel: A Master Class
Professor David Gilmour
M 4-6


Welcome to the 50,000-word club. Not for tourists. Writing, certainly at the level of a professional novelist, is not a hobby. It’s a calling. A distinguished New York editor, when asked how he picks a novel for publication, responded, “I read the first sentence. If I like it, I read the second. If I like the second…” You know where it goes from here. So, that’s where we start, where all literature starts: with a story. 

We're also going to discuss and deeply consider this essential question:  how should I work? How you work is as important as having a good story: Do you do it in the morning, in the evening? For two hours or, like Balzac, for twelve. Until you discover how to work, you won’t. Other concerns: Many young writers misunderstand the role of dialogue: they think it’s a sort of time-out, a place to ease-up. It’s not. Good dialogue pushes a story forward as fast and with more muscle than prose. And then there’s the issue of "finishing things." Bars all over the world are full of boozy ex-patriots who never "quite finished" their novel and it's haunted them ever since. You must finish what you start, even if it's terrible. You can't rewrite something until you know how it ends.

In this class, students are expected to finish a first draft manuscript of at least 50,000 words by April (2000 words a week, every week, no excuses, attendance compulsory, punctuality non-negotiable). To appreciate the gravity of how we do things in a Master Class, try and talk to someone who has already taken it. As I said, it’s not a course for tourists.


Prerequisite: Application required
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)




VIC480H1-S
Poetry: A Master Class
Professor Bruce Meyer
R 6-8


A workshop course in writing poetry. Designed for those with a serious ambition to be writers as evinced in work they are already doing. Does not offer instruction for beginning writers. Presupposes perfect and sophisticated written language skills.


Prerequisite: Application required.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

Current Students