2016-2017 Courses


IVP210H1S
Holography for 3D Visualization
Professor Emanuel Istrate
Lecture: T 9-11    Practical: T 4-7; R 9-12

What kinds of skills does it take to make holograms? It actually takes both science and art if you want to have a hologram that is technically successful and also artistically meaningful. Our course combines concepts of science and art, in order to explain how holography works, but also how to use it in an artistic setting. We take a very hands-on approach, working in the University’s holography studio located at the Impact Centre. While making holograms, we explain the physical processes at play. In the two projects, students work in teams to create artistically valuable holograms that will be presented to the rest of the class. After we explain the optics of holography, it is easy to survey other places where optical physics gets used. At the same time, we compare the medium of holography to other artistic media, identifying their unique strengths. As we combine both art and science, the course is aimed at students of any discipline. No prerequisites are needed.

Exclusion: JOP210H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)



VIC270H1F
Listening: A Critical History
Professor Sherry Lee
R 1-3

Surveying scenarios for public and private musical listening, from historical contexts to the present, this course explores critical questions about how we listen, including the relationship between musical genres and listening situations, the definition of music vs. noise, the influence of spectatorship, and the impact of changing technologies. Students discuss the changing aesthetics and ideologies of musical listening, considering ways in which listening shapes our understanding of the social and our awareness of communities.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC271H1S
Reading the Wild
Professor John Bemrose
W 2-4

In light of the environmental crisis, this seminar surveys a wide range of oral and written literature in order to discover how our approach to nature has changed over the centuries, what gains and losses have attended modernity, and what older cultures can teach us as we seek to preserve threatened ecosystems.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC275H1F
Creative Writing: Short Fiction
Professor John Bemrose
W 2-4

Alice Munro’s winning of the Nobel Prize has helped elevate the short story to a new level of regard. Not simply a poor cousin of the novel, the short story is an exquisitely demanding form in its own right, combining the compression of poetry with the psychological range usually associated with much longer works. 

In this seminar students will study a variety of short stories, with the aim of writing stories of their own. We will focus on such authors as Chekhov, Lawrence, Hemingway, Gordimer, Gallant, Munro, and Atwood, as well as some exciting newer talents, among them Junot Diaz and Lorrie Moore. We’ll also examine many technical issues including structure, the life of sentences and the handling of time, as well as the unique demands of the short story form. 

Students will complete a few in-class exercises and take-home assignments, but the main project for the semester will be to write a short story. Consultations with the instructor will be an important part of this process, mirroring the relationship that professional writers have with their editors.

Prerequisite: Application Required. Deadline to apply is June 1st, 2016.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC279H1S
Creative Non-Fiction
Professor Lisa Khoo
M 6-8

This course examines the forms, style, aims, and ethics of non-fictional forms such as documentary writing, journalism, and life-writing. It combines the study of examples from contemporary media with exercises in writing non-fictional prose.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1



VIC280H1F
Creative Writing: Poetry
Professor Al Moritz
W 12-2

This course will allow poets to build poetry writing skills through reading, discussion and, primarily, practice. On each class day, we’ll workshop our own poetry: participating poets will discuss each others work. From time to time we’ll also discuss model poems, and issues in poetry writing, from the assigned books and from handouts. 

Prerequisite: Application required. Deadline to apply is June 1st, 2016 (Deadline has passed for 2016-17 year).
Exclusion: VIC350Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC350Y1Y
Creative Writing
Professor David Gilmour
T 11-1

Reading a lot may be helpful for a young writer but it’s not a replacement for the real thing: the act of writing itself. So we will not load you down with a ton of reading (just the masters, Chekhov, Updike, etc) but will demand of you instead a rigorous output of work. Regardless of what literary era you find yourself in, the trick to good writing is a good story. Pretty sentences strung together like Christmas lights won’t cut it on their own. You must have a story where the reader is compelled to move from one sentence to the next. So we’re going to work on this, both in poetry and prose: Am I interested in what the writer’s talking about? Do I want to read the next sentence? If you get a double yes for those questions, you’re half way there. Remember, good writing involves darkening hundreds and hundreds of pages, usually badly, until you write a good one. Then you’re on your way.


Prerequisite: Application Required. Deadline to apply is June 1, 2016.  Preference given to fourth and third-year students. (Deadline has passed for 2016-17 year).
Exclusion: VIC280H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC370H1S
Music and the Imagination
Professor Ken McLeod
R 1-3

This course explores how music creatively reflects and inspires our sense of self, place and community through readings, close listening, case studies, and creative responses. We consider various sites of musical imagination, and the genres that intersect with them. Course discussion addresses how music participates in the social life of creativity, imagination and fantasy, and what these roles mean for music's significance in society and culture. No prior experience in music composition required.

Prerequisite: Completion of 6.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC371H1F
Photojournalism
Professor Rita Leistner
R 5-8

This seminar course looks at the history and evolution of photojournalism and documentary photography, their changing contexts and challenges in the digital era. We investigate photographs old and new. Students discuss major visual stories in the news. They also read writings about photography and photojournalism from some of its most important practitioners. No camera required. Students from all disciplines and areas of interest welcome.

Prerequisite: Completion of 6.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC372H1F
Reviewing, Reception, and Reading Communities
Professor Heather Murray
W 10-12

Everyone’s a critic! That line is an old joke, but it seems to be true today. When anyone can “review” anything, from a book to a pair of socks ordered on-line, have “liking,” “sharing,” and WOM (word of mouth) become the most important forms of reviewing? We will begin by thinking about more traditional forms of reviewing (considered assessments written by experts for an informed audience), and will survey the history of reviewing. But then we will focus on readers and reading groups to think about the ways people form social (and social media) collectives to learn about, evaluate, discuss, share, and creatively experiment with books. This course will give you the opportunity to do first-hand research into contemporary cultural phenomena such as on-line reviewing, fanfic groups, literary shows and competitions (such as Canada Reads), and book clubs and book discussion groups of many varieties (real-world, virtual, and televisual including the “Oprah” book club). We’ll try to find answers to some fundamental questions: how do we decide what makes a book (or a performance, or a painting) worth recommending? What motivates this desire to share our “likes,” dislikes, reactions, and opinions?

Prerequisite: Completion of 6.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC479Y1Y
The Novel: A Master Class
Professor David Gilmour
M 4-6

Not for tourists. Writing, certainly at the level of a professional novelist, is not a hobby. It’s a calling. A distinguished New York editor, when asked how he picks a novel for publication, responded, “I read the first sentence. If I like it, I read the second. If I like the second…” You know where it goes from here. So that’s where we start, where all literature starts: with a story. Then we’re going to discuss and deeply consider another question: how do I work? How you work is as important as having a good story: Do you do it in the morning, in the evening? For two hours or, like Balzac, for twelve. Until you discover how to work, you won’t. Many young writers misunderstand the role of dialogue: they think it’s time-out, a place for ease-up. It’s not. Good dialogue pushes a story forward as fast and as deeply as prose. And then there’s the issue of finishing. You must learn to finish what you start. Here, students are expected to produce a manuscript of at least 50,000 words (2000 words a week with the tag “The End” at the conclusion.As I said, it’s not a course for tourists.

 

Prerequisite: Application required. Deadline to apply is June 1st, 2016 (Deadline has passed for 2016-17 year).
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC480H1S
Poetry: A Master Class
Professor Al Moritz
R 4-6

A workshop course in writing poetry. Designed for those with a serious ambition to be writers as evinced in work they are already doing. Does not offer instruction for beginning writers. Presupposes perfect and sophisticated written language skills.

Prerequisite: Application required. Deadline to apply is June 1st, 2016. (Deadline has passed for 2016-17 year).
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

Current Students