Courses 2014-15

VIC202Y1 Y
Forms of Representation
Professor Julian  Patrick
TR 2, TUT: R3, R4

An essential course for any student in the Humanities, and indeed for any university student because it investigates the basic forms of narrative representation, and according to some accounts, that is where thinking starts.

Exclusion: VIC201Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


VIC203Y1 Y
Empire and Globalization
Professor Mary Nyquist
W 1-3, TUT: W3, W4

This course explores numerous facets of Euro-colonialism and racialism as they inform selected literary, visual, and politico-philosophical texts. Beginning with early modern globalism as it relates to the Spanish Empire, we will study capitalist, colonialist, anti-colonialist or -imperialist, feminist and modernist discourses and texts. Students will learn to situate the literature we discuss in a broad historical framework, and will be encouraged to think critically about contemporary representations of globalization.

Exclusion: VIC210Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2) + Society and its Institutions (3)


VIC204H1 F
Canons and Canonicity
TBA
T 11-1

This course will consider the problem of canons in a variety of contexts: the aesthetic (including the literary, visual arts and music), but also the religious, the political, the philosophical and other discursive forms. Special focus will be on the problem of the relations across these boundaries.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


VIC302H1 F
Past and Futures: The Inventions of the Past
Professor Andreas Motsch
M 3-5

Time and space are crucial reference points in our understanding of human existence and have long been considered as universally applicable concepts. However, the study of different civilizations as well as philosophical analysis have shown that the Western understanding of these categories is itself historically and culturally relative: in other words it is influenced by our way of viewing the world and our place in it. This course explores the understanding of time and in particular our ways of thinking about the past and its relationship to the present and the future. We will do this through an analysis of very different "texts" like books, films and museum displays arising from a variety of disciplines and approaches. The guiding question will be how humans experience time and what knowledge we derive from this experience for the construction of our worldview. How do we know about the past? What does it tell us? Do we need to have a past? Can we have a future without a past and what would it be? How is time different for humans and objects? What could it mean to "change the past'? These questions will lead us to critical reflections on origin-myths, concepts of time, civilizations, progress and utopia. Literary discourse (literature, mythology, poetry, film) plays a significant role in this course, but so does historical discourse (history, ethnography, archeology and museum collections). In this course we will look at how Renaissance and Enlightenment thinkers study their past, how history is being produced through study and documented in books and material collections; how the study of the past relates to the study of non-European cultures and how the past shapes the present and the future. This course uses different approaches such as phenomenology and the history if ideas which are reflected in the course material. The following gives an idea of the body of works used in the course, yet the final selection of texts will be confirmed at the beginning of the term. All texts are discussed in English, but students are encouraged to read original versions where available. Some possible books for study are : The Bible (and other origin myths from various civilizations); Thomas Moore, Utopia; Francis Bacon, Silva Silvarum; Jean Jacques Rousseau; Discourse on the ... Arts and Sciences; Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The origin of the family; H.G. Wells, The Time Machine; Marcel Proust, A la recherche du temps perdu; Martin Amis, Time's arrow, George Orwell, 1984. Films: Jean Jacques Annaud, Quest for Fire; Bob Conolly and Robin Anderson, First Contact; Ridley Scott, Blade Runner. These texts will also help understand concepts of time: ?Krysztof Pomian, L'ordre du temps (French only); Alain Schnapp, La conquête du passé (The discovery of the past); Paul Ricour, Temps et récit (Time and Narrative).

Recommended Preparation: VIC202Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


VIC303H1 F
Memory and Trauma: James Joyce's Ulysses
Professor Jennifer Levine
R 5-7

The required reading list for this course is very brief, and consists of a single work: Joyce's Ulysses . In VIC 303 we will have the luxury of spending an entire term reading and exploring some of the many questions it provokes. Our initial framework will revolve around memory: how is our identity linked to what we remember and to the ways we are remembered? What does it mean to remember - and to forget? These questions press themselves on Joyce's characters, as they do on readers: a dense work of almost 1000 pp, filled with names and details whose significance is never spelled out, testing our resources as memory-machines.

We will consider trauma, as both physical and psychic injury, and its surrounding constellation: pain, shock, disruption, loss, silence. Does trauma create a break in time, producing a sense of "before" and "after"? How does the work of memory (re-membering, re-connecting, commemorating) respond? Ulysses engages us in narratives about the individual, the family, the city, the nation. It reflects on language and on storytelling at every level -- ranging from the most ordinary talk of daily life to the most sophisticated literary experiments. We will consider the many ways in which memory and trauma - but also memory and desire, laughter, joy -- play themselves out in these various contexts.

Recommended Preparation: VIC 202Y and/or VIC 203Y. Students should have a solid foundation in reading and analysis, and be prepared for a challenge.
Exclusion: VIC309H1, VIC310Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


VIC304H1 F

Praxis and Performance
Professor Eva-Lynn Jagoe
M 12-2

This course will explore what it means to “act” in cultural, political, sexual, and psychological realms. We will focus on the relations between theory and practice, between artifice and agency, and between theatricality and spectatorship through a series of engagements with literature, film, critical theory, and visual art. Special attention will be given to questions of self and responsibility. There will be a focus on our own praxis, with experiments in collaborative work, different kinds of writing exercises, and the opportunity to engage in creative production.

Recommended Preparation: VIC202Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


VIC305H1 S
Institutions and Power
Professor Luca Somigli
T 4-6

This course will consider some of the ideologies and practices of various institutions at work in the production and transmission of cultural objects and social power. These may include the family, museum, hospital, prison, university, library, and theatre, as well as fields such as publishing and religion.

VIC305H1S Syllabus [PDF]

Recommended Preparation: VIC202Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


VIC306H1 S
Culture and Media
Professor Julian Patrick
W 6-8

This course will consider relations between various cultural media – such as film, literature, photography, visual art, architecture – with specific attention to the historical demands and possibilities posed by technological change.

Recommended Preparation: VIC202Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


VIC307H1 F
Periodization and Cultural History: 1945-1968 in Europe and the Americas
Professor Jennifer Levine
T 4-6

This course explores the phenomenon of historical periodization in its various modes, including as a stylistic concept, a set of discursive norms for cataloguing and grouping cultural forms, and a means of organizing and contesting historical narratives.

The course in 2014 will focus on the years between the end of war in 1945 and the events of May 1968 in Paris, when many believed that revolutionary transformation was imminent. They provide an interesting focus precisely because they have not been consolidated into a "period." Instead, they have been splintered into an overlapping and divergent array of terms such as the Fifties, the Sixties, the New Novel, Italian Neo-Realism, Magic Realism, the New Wave, Existentialism, Structuralism and Post-Structuralism, the Cold War, the end of European empires and the consolidation of neo-imperialism. As such, they also invite questions about the concept of periodization itself. How do we bring these disparate categories into conversation with each other? Are they at all useful? To what extent is it productive to think of the years 1945-1968 as a period? And how do specific works themselves reflect on periodization and time? Works studied will include literature, photography, and film.

Precise reading list tba, but likely authors will be Borges, Lessing, Robbe-Grillet, di Lampedusa, and film-makers such as de Sica, Hitchcock, Antonioni.

Recommended Preparation: VIC 202Y or VIC 203Y. This is not an introductory course. It is designed for 3rd year students in Literature and Critical Theory, or students with a background in literature or complementary disciplines (philosophy, cultural anthropology, cinema studies, fine art history, etc).
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


VIC401H1

Seminar in Comparative Literature

Please visit www.vic.utoronto.ca/students/academics/lct/vic401 for full listing of VIC401H1 courses.

Prerequisite: Application required
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


VIC402H1 S
Translation and Comparativity
Professor Willi Goetschel
M 2-4

In which way is language, speech, writing, and communication dependent on translation? Is reading and speaking always already translation? Is what we do when we think also already translation as Wittgenstein suggested? This course explores introduces to the way in which language and translation have been theorized as tools and media that facilitate and complicate communication as transfer of knowledge on the one hand and, on the other, the capability to create and express individuality. Readings include texts from the works of Spinoza, Mendelssohn, Goethe, Humboldt, Schleiermacher, Marx, Benjamin, Derrida.

Prerequisite: VIC202Y1 and one of: VIC302H1, VIC303H1, VIC304H1, VIC305H1, VIC306H1, VIC307H1; or permission of instructor.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


VIC494H1 / Y1
LCT Senior Research Paper
N/A
N/A

This course provides an opportunity to design an interdisciplinary course of study, not otherwise available within the Faculty, with the intent of addressing specific topics in Literature and Critical Theory. Written application (detailed proposal, reading list and a letter of support from a Victoria College faculty member who is prepared to supervise) must be submitted for approval on behalf of Victoria College.

Prerequisite: A minimum CGPA of 3.0 and have completed 15 FCEs and permission of College Program Director.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: None

LCT Senior Research Paper Application

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