Courses 2017-18

VIC101H1F
Conflict Theory and Practice
Professor Vic Falkenheim
F 10-12


This course is a general orientation to conflict theory, and develops a basic understanding of essential conflict resolution principles that will complement the study of conflict theory. The course will examine the differences between conflicts and disputes, the functions and desirability of conflict, and the conditions that facilitate conversion of conflicts from destructive to constructive. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Exclusion: VIC101Y1; Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)



VIC106H1F/S
Psychology and Society
Professor Joel Faflak
R 12-2


What’s the difference between sanity and madness? Who decides the difference? This course will focus on the psychology of the creative imagination as both inspiring and mad. How do works of imagination reflect the madness of individuals and society? How do they transgress accepted modes of thought? When does ‘normal’ start to look crazy? From Plato, Revelation, or Gilgamesh to King Lear, William Blake, and The Dark Knight, this course explores the psychotic peril of alternate states of mind as symptoms of issues and ideas society resists confronting. Ultimately this is a course about both the hyper-rational and irrational psychology of society. We will examine madness through characters and societies driven to insanity; through narrators we can’t trust; or through writers whose artistic vision threatens the status quo. We will explore how culture reflects historical attitudes toward mental illness, and consider critical and theoretical perspectives that address the fine line between truth and illusion, reality and myth, the sensible and insensible. Ultimately, the course invites us to challenge our own cultural, social, and ethical norms of thought and action. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Exclusion: VIC206H1, Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)



VIC109H1F/S
Innovators and their Ideas
Professor Joanna Papayiannis
T 10-12

Innovation is not a new phenomenon.  In fact, it is probably as old as humankind itself.  From Prehistoric times to the present, innovation has allowed us to produce more food, create shelter, make provisions for defense, communicate with other people, and be more mobile.  Though the primary function of innovation has been to provide us with a better way of life, the urge to innovate is often driven by other considerations, such as ideals of a rational order, visions of a new world, and perhaps sheer fascination with creating something new.  In this course, you will explore the nature and social dimension of ingenuity, from antiquity to the 21st century, focusing on a number of key innovations that have affected the course of humankind.  Through seminars, class activities and field trips, you will consider technological and scientific inventions like the printing press, the atomic bomb, and the computer, as well as innovations in arts and politics like democracy and writing.  From ancient Egypt to contemporary America, and from the Euphrates Valley of Mesopotamia to Silicon Valley, this course takes you around the world and across the ages to explore some of the most innovative moments in human civilization.

Exclusion: VIC109Y1; Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One,Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.

Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)



VIC112Y1Y
Puzzles Discovery and the Human Imagination
Professor Marcel Danesi
MW 9-10


Puzzles have been around as long as human history, from the Riddle of the Sphinx to Sudoku. They tell a fascinating story of human culture and the evolution of consciousness. This course will look at the history of puzzles, from riddles to optical illusions, to provide a sense of how they provide insights in the human mind and what they tell us about ourselves. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; 199 seminars or other Vic One Hundred seminars.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)



VIC116H1F/S
Politics of the Pen
Professor Camilla Gibb
T 2-4

A study of how literature challenges prevailing political beliefs and social norms. We will situate our discussion in the broader context of human rights and freedoms. We will examine cases where literature has been censored and writers have been imprisoned or driven into exile. Part of this course involves a community service-learning component. We will consider how this literature contributes to debate and advocacy around issues of social justice. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.  

Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, TrinityOne, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred. 

Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


VIC119H1S

Myths and Legends in Modern Contexts
Professor Cathie Sutton
R 10-12


This course provides an introduction to modern forms of ancient narratives, exploring the ways in which selected ancient literary sources and myths have been adapted to modern Canadian literature. Ancient narratives or ‘old stories’ are often reused, reinterpreted or reconstructed in modern narratives and given new relevance in a contemporary context. Students will encounter sources and contexts of ancient narratives. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC134H1S
Globalization
Professor Vic Falkenheim
F 10-12


This interdisciplinary course explores the contemporary character of globalization. The world is shrinking as money, goods, people, ideas, weapons, and information flow across national boundaries. Some commentators assert that a more tightly interconnected world can exacerbate financial disruptions, worsen the gap between rich and poor nations, undermine democracy, imperil national cultures, harm the environment, and give unconstrained freedom to predatory corporations. Others proclaim that globalization - understood as capitalism and free markets - fosters economic growth, encourages creative collaboration, inspires technological breakthroughs, and enhances human prospects for a better life, in rich and poor countries alike, in unprecedented ways. Our task is to evaluate the evidence and draw our own conclusions. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.



Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3) 



VIC135H1F
The Death of Meaning
Professor Andrew Lawless
T 11-1


This course examines some of the ways in which the idea that our lives have a transcendent (or ‘higher’) meaning – or indeed any meaning at all – has come under scrutiny in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. It begins with an examination of Darwin’s theory of evolution, set against the background of the Platonic philosophy that had deeply influenced western thought for over 2000 years. We will consider how Darwin’s argument that humans are not qualitatively different from the rest of the animal kingdom, but rather are, like them, simply products of evolution, has forced us to rethink our sense of ourselves as ‘exceptional’ beings at the center of a god’s creation or at the top of the ‘tree of life’. 


We will then discuss how this rethinking of our place in the great scheme of things plays out in a series of short ‘classic’ texts that range across politics (John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty, which was published in the same year as Darwin’s On the Origin of Species), philosophy (Ludwig Wittgenstein’s Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus and Jean-Paul Sartre’s Existentialism is a Humanism), and literature (Samuel Beckett’s absurdist and tragi-comic play, Waiting for Godot).


While I will provide background and guidance for each of the texts, I encourage you to respond to them in whatever way seems reasonable to you, and to be willing to discuss your response in class. A seminar is a collaborative exercise, a place to share views in a relaxed and informal environment.

Not eligible for CR/NCR option.



Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)



VIC136H1S
How to Study Everyday Life
Professor Ivan Kalmar
R 2-4


An introduction to the academic study of everyday life. A cross-disciplinary discussion class drawing on a wide variety of examples from ordinary life, fantasy, and culture. We situate the apparently innocuous within larger patterns of social relations and social change. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Exclusion: Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred. 
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)



VIC141H1F
Discovery and Revolution
Professor Konrad Eisenbichler
M 10-12


This course examines the emergence of a global modern world in relation to the upheavals of the Renaissance (1350-1700) and its discoveries and innovations in social organization, politics, science, travel, art and architecture, literature and philosophy, religion and music. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; 199 seminars or other Vic One Hundred seminar.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course 
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


VIC142H1S
Machiavelli: The Politics of Power
Professor Manuela Scarci
M 10-12

The name of Machiavelli unleashes powerful opinions and responses and conjures up trickery, duplicity and cynicism. Yet Machiavelli himself is arguably the least Machiavellian of political figures of the Italian Renaissance. This course examines the writings of Niccolò Machiavelli, placing them in their historical context in order to understand this most controversial figure of the Renaissance, his influence and his lasting legacy. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Exclusions: VIC141Y; Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course 
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

Current Students