Vic One Hundred Courses 2014-2015

VIC101H1 F
Conflict Theory and Practice
Professor Vic Falkenheim
T 10-12

This course is a general orientation to conflict theory, and develops a basic understanding of essential conflict resolution principles that will complement the study of conflict theory. The course will examine the differences between conflicts and disputes, the functions and desirability of conflict, and the conditions that facilitate conversion of conflicts from destructive to constructive.

VIC101H1F Syllabus [PDF]

Exclusion: VIC101Y1; Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

 

VIC101H1 S
Conflict Theory and Practice
Professor Vic Falkenheim
F 10-12

This course is a general orientation to conflict theory, and develops a basic understanding of essential conflict resolution principles that will complement the study of conflict theory. The course will examine the differences between conflicts and disputes, the functions and desirability of conflict, and the conditions that facilitate conversion of conflicts from destructive to constructive.

Exclusion: VIC101Y1; Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

 

VIC104H1 S
Common Vices and Neglected Virtues: Intro to Ethics of Character
Professor Paul Gooch
R 10-12

Vice is popular: a prestigious university press has brought out a series of seven books on the Seven Deadly Sins. This course examines such questions as the following. Are greed, lust and gluttony just bad names for necessary and otherwise acceptable instincts? What is the place, in a good human life, of such qualities as honesty, trust, civility and the like? Are vices and virtues culturally determined or a matter of individual preference? Can character be taught, or is it rather a matter of genes and luck?

Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

 

VIC105H1 S
Odysseys: The Search for Meaning
Professor Bruce Meyer
T 7-9

Life is a journey, and the ways in which we interpret that journey are numerous and personal while at the same time they are universal. The journey motif is not merely about getting from point A to point B. It is about growing, experiencing, learning to tell stories, examining knowledge, questing for meaning, and finding a goal worthy of our highest ambitions and ideals. This course examines some of the great works of art and literature that pertain to the journey. From the Bible's Exodus and Homer's Odyssey to Medieval hagiologies and quest literature, Odysseys: The Search for Meaning embraces the questions of life and death, what we desire from our lives, and how we live our lives in order to grow in our understanding and our awareness of who we are.

Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


VIC106H1 S

Psychology and Society
Professor Mark Solovey
TR 1-2

This course provides an introduction to the development of psychology as a large and diverse scholarly discipline that has important scientific, philosophical, and social dimensions. We will focus mainly on important individuals, schools of thought, episodes, and controversies in psychology from the late 19th century to the present day. At times we will also examine relationships between psychology and related fields of knowledge, such as biology and psychiatry. In addition, we will consider the interactions between psychology and the wider society. So, we will analyze how political, social, and intellectual contexts have shaped psychological research, practices and theory. And we will examine how psychological research, practices, and theory have contributed to the development of modern society and informed our understandings of who we are.

Exclusion: VIC206H1, Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

 

VIC107H1 S
Evolution, Heredity, and Behaviour
Professor Nikolai Krementsov
R 1-3

This seminar examines historical developments of three major biological concepts--evolution, heredity, and behavior--and their impact on the understanding of human nature, humans' place in the universe, and human destiny within the Western intellectual tradition. Questions addressed in the seminar include: Can biology explain human behaviors, conditions, and circumstances? Is there a relationship between human biological diversity and social inequality? Could and should the direction of human evolution be controled? What are the risks and benefits of manipulating (human) hereditary material? Why have "nature-nurture" debates continued unabated for nearly two centuries? The seminar explores how cultural and social views have influenced the development of biology from the late 19th to the early 21st centuries and, in turn, how this development has influenced societal interpretations of human nature and human evolution. The seminar is structured thematically and chronologically around a series of classic works by prominent Western biologists, ranging from Charles Darwin to James D. Watson to Richard Dawkins. Through a close reading of these works in their historical, scientific, and social contexts, we examine different views on the control of human evolution and genetic manipulation and analyze historical debates about the social implications of knowledge about human heredity, behavior, and evolution. Major topics of discussions include evolution, eugenics, genetics, molecular biology, the human genome project, as well as their applications, including genetic screening, therapy, enhancement, and counseling.

VIC107H1S Syllabus [PDF]

Exclusion: VIC207H1, Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

 

VIC112Y1 Y 
Puzzles, Discovery and the Human Imagination
Professor Marcel Danesi
MW 9

This course looks at the origins of puzzles, from riddles and anagrams to modern-day crosswords and Sudoku, examining them for their contribution to discoveries in science and philosophy. The course will look at the importance of puzzles in anthropological and psychological terms. Also examined, are the reasons why some puzzles, like the Rubik's Cube, become popular and others do not.

Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; 199 seminars or another Vic One Hundred seminars.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

 

VIC119H1 S
Ancient Narratives in Modern Contexts
Professor Bob Brandeis 
W 11-1

This course provides an introduction to modern forms of ancient narratives, exploring the ways in which selected ancient literary sources and myths have been adapted to modern Canadian literature. Ancient narratives or ‘old stories’ are often reused, reinterpreted or reconstructed in modern narratives and given new relevance in a contemporary context. Students will encounter sources and contexts of ancient narratives.

Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

 

VIC135H1 F/S
The Death of Meaning
Professor Andrew Lawless
T 11-1

In The Origin of Species Darwin concluded there was no evidence to suggest that life was designed by a higher power. A corollary of this is that our lives lack any necessary purpose or meaning. Our reading will be directed to the question of what it means to lack ‘Meaning’.

VIC135H1S Syllabus [PDF]

Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

 

VIC159H1 S - L0101

Vic One Hundred Special Topic - Learning to Read Fiction: Narrative as Art 
Professor Edward Lobb
M 12-2

This course focuses on fiction as an art with its own techniques and demands on the reader rather than fiction used as historical/sociological data or seen through the lens of theory. Students will read several twentieth-century English-language novels and short stories which show fictional technique at its most subtle and rewarding. 

Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science or Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

 

VIC159H1 F - L5101
Vic One Hundred Special Topic - Heroes: The Literature of Leadership
Professor Bruce Meyer
T 7-9

Anyone can be a hero. Heroes are those who make order out of chaos, who step to the forefront of a situation and who present us with guidance and leadership. This course examines the various types of heroes we encounter and how their ideas point us toward our goals. The various types of heroes that will be discussed are The Common Hero, The Epic Hero, The Tragic Hero, The Infernal Hero, The Hero Saint, The Epic and Romance Hero, and the Supernatural and Divine Hero. From in literature, film, and art, these heroes will be examined from the perspective of what they teach us not only about who we are but about who we can become. Works by some of the great authors of literature will be studied in this course -- Sophocles, Achebe, E. Bronte, Whitman, Homer, Miller, Rilke and Machiavelli -- as well as some significant films, in order to arrive at an understanding of just what makes these figures so appealing to our imaginations and why they speak to us and inspire us to do great things as leaders.

Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science or Science course
Breadth Requirement: None
 

VIC159H1 S - L0201
Vic One Hundred Special Topic - Literature and Social Justice
Professor Camilla Gibb
T 10-12

In this seminar course, we will look at how literature can challenge prevailing political beliefs and social norms. We will situate our discussion in the broader context of human rights and freedoms. In the first half of the course we will examine cases where literature has been censored and writers have been imprisoned or driven into exile. Part of this course involves a community service learning component. We will be working with the Canadian chapter of PEN, on cases of writers in prison. In the second half of the course we will consider the challenge issued by contemporary works which portray muted or marginalized experiences, uncomfortable or inconvenient truths. We will consider how this literature contributes to debate and advocacy around issues of social justice. Throughout, we will explore questions of who is marginalized from literature, how that space is (re)claimed, how we become authors of our own experience and how we can extend that right to others in our midst.

Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One, Woodsworth One; No more than another 0.5 FCE from 199 seminars or Vic One Hundred.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science or Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

Current Students