Courses 2017-18


VIC240Y1-Y
The Civilization of Renaissance Europe
Professor Ken Bartlett
T 11-1


An interdisciplinary introduction to the civilization of the Renaissance illustrated by a study of the institutions, thought, politics, society and culture of both Italy and Northern Europe. Italian city states such as Florence, Urbino and Venice, Papal Rome and despotic Milan are compared with the northern dynastic monarchies of France and England.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1), Society and its Institutions (3)



VIC342H1-F
Women and Writing in the Renaissance
Professor Manuela Scarci
W 2-4


Focusing on writers from various geographical areas, the course examines a variety of texts by early modern women (for example, treatises, letters, and poetry) so as to explore the female experience in a literate society, with particular attention to how women constructed a gendered identity for themselves against the backdrop of the cultural debates of the time.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC343Y1-Y
Sex and Gender
Professors Konrad Eisenbichler (Fall) and Manuela Scarci (Winter)
M 2-4


An interdisciplinary approach to questions of gender and sexuality in early modern Europe, with special focus on the representations of the sexual drive, the gender roles of men and women, and varieties of sexual experience in the literature and art of the period.


Exclusion: VIC343H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3), Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)



VIC344H1-S
Renaissance Narrative
Professor Gregoire Holtz
W 2-4


Focuses on analysis of short stories and longer prose works including, in English translation: Boccaccio's stories of love, fortune and human intelligence in the Decameron; Rabelais' humorous parody of high culture in Gargantua; the tragic tale of Romeo and Juliet; and the adventures of picaresque rogues in Lazarillo de Tormes and Nashe's Unfortunate Traveler.


Exclusion: VIC242H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)




VIC345H1-F
Media and Communications in the Early Modern Era
Professor Konrad Eisenbichler
Lecture: T 10-12
Tutorial: W 4-5


This course examines the various media (printing press, representational art, music, preaching) and social and political forces (family and political networks, censorship, education, etc.) that conditioned the communication of ideas in early modern society.


Distribution Requirement:
Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC347H1-F
Studies in Renaissance Performance
Professor TBA
TBA


Studies in the development of new forms in music, drama and dance in the Renaissance. The course will consist of seminars and lectures, and may incorporate live performances taking place in Toronto in addition to recordings.



Exclusion:
VIC347Y1
Recommended Preparation: VIC240Y1, or another course in Renaissance Studies.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)




VIC440Y1-Y
Florence and the Renaissance
Professors Ken Bartlett (Fall) and Nick Terpstra (Winter)
T 2-4


An interdisciplinary seminar on Florence in the 15th and 16th centuries: humanism, culture and society in the republican period, the rise of the Medici, Florentine neoplatonism, the establishment of the Medici principate, culture, society and religion.


Prerequisite: VIC240Y1 or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1), Society and its Institutions (3)



VIC449H1-S
Advanced Seminar in the Renaissance: Exhibiting the Renaissance Book: Special Collections of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies
Professor Shaun Ross
R 2-4


Focus on European religious reformations,science, and humanism through print culture, ca. 1500-1700. Students engagedirectly with early, rare books to explore both the influential conceptspropagated through these texts and images, as well as their material productionand reception.  Final projects include constructing both a digital andlibrary exhibit.

 

DistributionRequirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

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