2016-2017 Courses

VIC240Y1Y
The Civilization of Renaissance Europe
Professor Ken Bartlett
T 11-1

An interdisciplinary introduction to the civilization of the Renaissance illustrated by a study of the institutions, thought, politics, society and culture of both Italy and Northern Europe. Italian city states such as Florence, Urbino and Venice, Papal Rome and despotic Milan are compared with the northern dynastic monarchies of France and England.

Distribution Requirement Status:This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement:Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Society and its Institutions (3)



VIC342H1F
Women and Writing in the Renaissance
Professor Manuela Scarci
W 2-4

Focusing on writers from various geographical areas, the course examines a variety of texts by early modern women (for example, treatises, letters, and poetry) so as to explore the female experience in a literate society, with particular attention to how women constructed a gendered identity for themselves against the backdrop of the cultural debates of the time.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC343Y1Y
Sex and Gender
Professor Konrad Eisenbichler
M 2-4

This course will begin with a discussion of the religious and scientific beliefs inherited from Antiquity that shaped early modern European ideas about gender, gender roles, sex, and sexual attitudes. It will then progress through various aspects of human social interactions (courting, coupling, marriage, reproduction etc.) during the Renaissance (1300-1700 CE) in order to identify some of the salient aspects of early modern views on sex and gender, and how they affected the daily life of early modern Europeans. Along the way, the course will deal with questions of femininity and masculinity, conception, same-sex and opposite-sex attraction, androgens, hermaphrodites, transvestites, chastity, etc.


Exclusion:VIC343H1
Distribution Requirement Status:This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2) + Society and its Institutions (3)



VIC345H1S
Media and Communications in the Early Modern Era
Professor Konrad Eisenbichler
Lecture: T 10-12  Tutorial: W 4-5


This course examines the various media (printing press, representational art, music, preaching) and social and political forces (family and political networks, censorship, education, etc.) that conditioned the communication of ideas in early modern society.


Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)



VIC346H1F
The Idea of the Renaissance
Professor David Galbraith
R 10-12

This course examines the changing views of the Renaissance, from the earliest definitions by poets and painters to the different understandings of contemporary historians. We will pay attention to the interests and biases that have informed the idea of the Renaissance as an aesthetic, social, political, gendered, and euro-centric phenomenon.


Prerequisite: Completion of 6.0 FCEs
Recommended Preparation: At least one half course in the art, literature, history, or philosophy of fifteenth or sixteenth century Europe
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)




VIC348Y1Y
The Renaissance in the Cities
(Fall) Professor Sanda Munjic; (Spring) Professor Matt Kavaler
W 12-2

An interdisciplinary course exploring the history, art, architecture, literature, and music of the Renaissance in one or more cities from ca. 1400-1650. The course will investigate how local political and social-historical contexts shape ideas and cultural forms, and so illustrate the process and effects of cross-fertilization in the Renaissance period.

Fall: The Renaissance in the Cities: Mexico City and Antwerp
By exploring the history, art, architecture, literature and music of the sixteenth and seventeenth century with Mexico City and Antwerp as geographical points of reference, this course explores the historical event known as “the Renaissance” outside of its traditional localities. Rising from the ashes of Tenochtitlan in 1521, colonial Mexico City as the center of the Vice-Royalty of New Spain becomes the preeminent contact zone between the Old and the New World. It is the hub for the exchange of peoples, goods and ideas that migrated across the Atlantic in the aftermath of the encounter of the two Worlds.

Antwerp became the financial centre of northern Europe in the sixteenth century and became with its economic rise a centre of publishing and the arts.  It became the cultural capital of the Habsburg lands, supplanting Bruges, which had served this function for the Burgudian Dukes of the fifteenth century.

These geographical locals – Mexico City and Antwerp – give an alternative perspective to how local political and social-historical contexts shape ideas and cultural forms, and illustrate the processes and effects of cross-fertilization in the Renaissance period.

Recommended Preparation: VIC240Y1, or another course in Renaissance Studies.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Society and its Institutions (3)




VIC440Y1Y
Florence and the Renaissance
(Fall) Professor Ken Bartlett; (Spring) Professor Konrad Eisenbichler
T 2-4


An interdisciplinary seminar on Florence in the 15th and 16th centuries: humanism, culture and society in the republican period, the rise of the Medici, Florentine neoplatonism, the establishment of the Medici principate, culture, society and religion. In the second half of the course we will examine the history, religion, culture, and art of Florence in the sixteenth century  as the Republic of Florence changed dramatically to become first the Duchy of Florence and then the Grand Duchy of Tuscany. In so doing we will  look especially at how the seventeen-year-old Duke Cosimo I de’ Medici managed not only to “inherit” the duchy (1537), but also stabilize its politics, expand and secure its borders, and revitalize its commerce, industry, and culture; not to mention, provide a secure dynastic Medici lineage that continued, uninterrupted, for two hundred years.

In the second half of the course we will examine the history, religion, culture, and art of Florence in the sixteenth century  as the Republic of Florence changed dramatically to become first the Duchy of Florence and then the Grand Duchy of Tuscany. In so doing we will  look especially at how the seventeen-year-old Duke Cosimo I de’ Medici managed not only to “inherit” the duchy (1537), but also stabilize its politics, expand and secure its borders, and revitalize its commerce, industry, and culture; not to mention, provide a secure dynastic Medici lineage that continued, uninterrupted, for two hundred years.


Prerequisite: VIC240Y1 or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Society and its Institutions (3)

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