FRYE STREAM COURSES


VIC162H1F/S
Cultural Forms and Their Meanings - Rome, Caput Mundi: The Reading of a City
Professor Ken Bartlett
R 1-3


This course will follow both the urban development and the idea of Rome from its mythical foundations, through the Roman Empire, the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Baroque to the modern city.  The richly illustrated classes will show the buildings and the sites that encouraged the idea of Rome and the shift from the pagan imperial to the Christian papal city which finally emerged as the capital of a united Italy after 1870.  We will learn how to “read” a city over time by following its growth, decline, structure and decoration.  Besides a modern text on Rome, we will read excerpts from various primary sources to gain an insight into how the city was perceived and how the “idea” of Rome came to form part of the definition of western culture.


Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC163H1, VIC164H1, VIC165H1 and 1.0 FCE in any 100-level ENG or FAH or PHL
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)





VIC163H1F/S
Cultural Forms and Their Meanings: People and Ideas
Professor Anne Urbancic
MW 12-1


When we hear phrases such as “Hurry up”, “Calm down” or “buy in”, we concentrate on the verb. But where are the places indicated by “up” and “down” and “in”? How can a house burn up and burn down contemporaneously? What do we mean when we say things like “give me some space?” Where exactly is head space? And what is the space envisaged by Northrop Frye as the castle of words that he mentions in The Educated Imagination?


In VIC163H we will study the ideas of some of the theorists who have considered the spaces of our language and our life, including Derrida, McLuhan, De Certeau, Virilio. We will examine how they posited our understanding of the concept of space: physical, metaphorical,emotional, psychological, linguistic. We will consider how our highly technological and mediated world has affected the concept of space, and, with it, also the concept of time. We will work as a class, and in smaller groups,to show how these theories apply to our everyday lives, from the toothpaste we use, the coffee shop we choose, the stores we frequent, even to the way we view literature.


There will be ample opportunity for consultation and discussion as we: 

  • examine theoretical perspectives, 
  • consider how we practice everyday life, including in the visual arts, music, film, architecture, and/or local urban artifacts, 
  • critically reflect and report on our own roles in today’s ‘global village’ (yet another metaphorical space), and our responsibilities to it. 

At the end of the course you’ll be able to consider your personal and global environment from several new perspectives.Be warned: former students tell me that they can no longer enter a shop, a theatre, a church, a hospital etc. etc. without being reminded of what they learned this course!!!


Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC162H1, VIC164H1, VIC165H1 and 1.0 FCE in any 100-level ENG or FAH or PHL 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)





VIC164H1F/S
Ideas and Their Consequences: Literary and Artistic Realms of the Imagination
Professor Stephen Rupp
MW 12-1 


A study of the ideas and concerns of creative thinkers and their impact upon cultures. The course includes literary, scientific and/or religious intellectuals from the major traditions. Attention to modes of reasoning, cultural definition and expression. Emphasis on philosophical and artistic concepts. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC162H1, VIC163H1, VIC165H1 and 1.0 FCE in any 100-level ENG or FAH or PHL 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)





VIC165H1F/S
Ideas and Their Consequences: Individual and Community in Modern Culture
Professor Al Moritz
R 1-3


What is the role of the artist in contemporary society? As a spokesperson for “the people”? As a prophetic instigator? As an insider or an outsider? And what if the poet herself is outside the centre of “mainstream culture”? What does a minority poet “owe” to his community? Is incorporating new techniques and styles a betrayal or an extension of tradition? These are some of the questions this course will address, focusing mainly on poetry, and spanning over 150 years in literary history. A major goal will be to examine how different artists have approached the role of the artist in relation to his/her community, and how that relationship manifests itself in their work.


Prerequisite: Admission to Vic One
Corequisite: VIC162H1,VIC163H1, VIC164H1 and 1.0 FCE in any 100-level ENG or FAH or PHL 
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, SMC One, Trinity One, UC One, Woodsworth One, 199 seminars, Vic One Hundred courses.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

Future Students