2018-19 Courses


VIC240Y1Y
The Civilization of Renaissance Europe
Professor Ken Bartlett
Lecture: T 11-1

An interdisciplinary introduction to the civilization of the Renaissance illustrated by a study of the institutions, thought, politics, society and culture of both Italy and Northern Europe. Italian city states such as Florence, Urbino and Venice, Papal Rome and despotic Milan are compared with the northern dynastic monarchies of France and England.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Society and its Institutions (3)


VIC342H1S
Women and Writing in the Renaissance
Professor Manuela Scarci
W 2-4

Focusing on writers from various geographical areas, the course examines a variety of texts by early modern women (for example, treatises, letters, and poetry) so as to explore the female experience in a literate society, with particular attention to how women constructed a gendered identity for themselves against the backdrop of the cultural debates of the time.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

 


VIC343Y1Y
Sex and Gender
Professor Konrad Eisenbichler
M 2-4

An interdisciplinary approach to questions of gender and sexuality in early modern Europe, with special focus on the representations of the sexual drive, the gender roles of men and women, and varieties of sexual experience in the lives, literature, and art of the period.

Exclusion: VIC343H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2) + Society and its Institutions (3)


VIC344H1S
Renaissance Narrative
Professor Gregoire Holtz
T 10-12

Focuses on analysis of short stories and longer prose works including, in English translation: Boccaccio's stories of love, fortune and human intelligence in the Decameron; Rabelais' humorous parody of high culture in Gargantua; the tragic tale of Romeo and Juliet; and the adventures of picaresque rogues in Lazarillo de Tormes and Nashe's Unfortunate Traveler.

Exclusion: VIC242H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


VIC345H1F
Media and Communications in the Early Modern Era
Professor Konrad Eisenbichler
Lecture: T 10-12
Tutorial: W 4-5

This course examines the various media (printing press, representational art, music, preaching) and social and political forces (family and political networks, censorship, education, etc.) that conditioned the communication of ideas in early modern society.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


VIC347H1F
Renaissance Performance
Professor Shaun Ross
R 2-4

Studies in the development of new forms in music, drama and dance in the Renaissance. The course will consist of seminars and lectures, and may incorporate live performances taking place in Toronto in addition to recordings.

Exclusion: VIC347Y1
Recommended Preparation: VIC240Y1, or another course in Renaissance Studies.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


VIC440Y1Y
Florence and the Renaissance
Professor Ken Bartlett; Professor Konrad Eisenbichler
T 2-4

An interdisciplinary seminar on Florence in the 15th and 16th centuries: humanism, culture and society in the republican period, the rise of the Medici, Florentine neoplatonism, the establishment of the Medici principate, culture, society and religion. In the second half of the course we will examine the history, religion, culture, and art of Florence in the sixteenth century  as the Republic of Florence changed dramatically to become first the Duchy of Florence and then the Grand Duchy of Tuscany. In so doing we will  look especially at how the seventeen-year-old Duke Cosimo I de’ Medici managed not only to “inherit” the duchy (1537), but also stabilize its politics, expand and secure its borders, and revitalize its commerce, industry, and culture; not to mention, provide a secure dynastic Medici lineage that continued, uninterrupted, for two hundred years.

In the second half of the course we will examine the history, religion, culture, and art of Florence in the sixteenth century  as the Republic of Florence changed dramatically to become first the Duchy of Florence and then the Grand Duchy of Tuscany. In so doing we will  look especially at how the seventeen-year-old Duke Cosimo I de’ Medici managed not only to “inherit” the duchy (1537), but also stabilize its politics, expand and secure its borders, and revitalize its commerce, industry, and culture; not to mention, provide a secure dynastic Medici lineage that continued, uninterrupted, for two hundred years.

Prerequisite: VIC240Y1 or permission of the instructor 
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course 
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Society and its Institutions (3)


VIC441H1F
Montaigne
Professor Paul Cohen
W 10-12

A study of Montaigne as a multifaceted historical and cultural figure, as a mirror to sixteenth-century history, as product and observer of the religious divisions, political transformations, and cultural evolutions in an age marked by religious war, the growth of the state, the advent of the printed book, and the dissemination of the humanist project across Western Europe. The course examines Montaigne’s essays, travel journals, and important scholarly works on Montaigne, in the context of contemporary gender relations, colonial empire, religious belief, and early modern Europe’s complex relationship with Greco-Roman Antiquity. 

Prerequisite: VIC240Y1/​ HIS243H1 or permission of the instructor
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


VIC449H1S
The Renaissance Book
Professor Shaun Ross
R 2-4

This seminar will consider the rich intellectual history of Renaissance Europe through hands-on interaction with the rare book collection at the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies. It will give students the opportunity to handle some of the earliest printed books in European history, and to understand both the technologies and cultures that produced them. As part of the course, students will develop practical research skills by pursuing a public-facing research project that includes a physical as well as digital exhibition of books published in the Renaissance. Previous coursework on book history is not required. 

Recommended Preparation: VIC240Y1, or another course in Renaissance Studies.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities 

Current Students