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Vic One Hundred Courses

You can add Vic One Hundred/FYF courses through ACORN/ROSI. No special application is required.

Start building a strong foundation for your academic career from day one with a small-class experience. First-Year Foundation Seminars, including Vic One Hundred courses, help you form relationships with professors, network with peers in an accessible environment and transition to university studies.

 

VIC106H1F/S | Psychology and Society

VIC106H1F/S
Psychology and Society
Professor Joel Faflak
R 12-2

This course explores central developments and ongoing controversies in the scientific study of the human mind, brain and behaviour. It examines topics such as: psychoanalysis, behaviourism, humanistic psychology, evolutionary psychology, intelligence testing, and feminist perspectives. Goals include understanding the historical evolution and social relevance of scientific psychology. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Exclusion - VIC206H1
Distribution Requirement -
Humanities, Social Science
Breadth Requirement
- Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

VIC107H1S | Evolution, Genetics, and Behaviour

VIC107H1S
Evolution, Genetics, and Behaviour
Professor Elizabeth Koester
M 1-3

In this course we examine major episodes in the history of evolution and genetics in the twentieth century. Topics include Darwinian evolution, sociobiology and evolutionary psychology, eugenics, and genetic screening and therapy. We will examine different views about the control of evolution and genetic manipulation in their socio-cultural-economic context and discuss the ethical and social implications of those views. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Exclusion: VIC207H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities, Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)
VIC108H1F | Belonging, Imagination, and Indigenous Identity

VIC108H1F
Belonging, Imagination, and Indigenous Identity
Professor Ken Derry
F 12-2


This course will examine questions of belonging, imagination, and Indigenous identity as presented by a number of Indigenous films. Specifically, we will be looking at how these films frame identity in relation to both Indigenous communities and to the larger non-Indigenous nations where these communities reside. A key focus of the course will be to consider Indigenous cinematic responses to the historical and ongoing harm of colonialism, and how these films might be part of the process of healing that needs to take place.


Exclusion - VIC108Y1
Distribution Requirement -
Humanities, Social Science
Breadth
 Requirement - Society and its Institutions (3)

VIC108H1S | Belonging, Imagination, and Indigenous Identity

VIC108H1S
Belonging, Imagination, and Indigenous Identity
Professor Jonathan Hamilton-Diabo
T 2-4

Identifying with an Indigenous nation (First Nations, Metis or Inuit) is a complex and ever-evolving reality for many due to diverse worldviews, experiences, histories and connection to family and/or community.  This course will explore past and present meaning of belonging; how imagination informs expression; and the dynamics within community relations and engagement.

Exclusion - VIC108Y1
Distribution Requirement -
Humanities, Social Science
Breadth
 Requirement - Society and its Institutions (3)

VIC109H1F | Innovators and Their Ideas

VIC109H1F
Innovators and Their Ideas
Professor Joanna Papayiannis
W 10-12

A study of the ideas and concerns of innovators who questioned traditional views and values. The course includes creative thinkers who challenged basic concepts on politics, literature, religion, and society. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Exclusion - VIC109Y1
Distribution Requirement -
Humanities
Breadth
 Requirement - Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

VIC110H1F | Critical Perspectives on Society

VIC110H1F
Critical Perspectives on Society
Professor David Cook
M 2-4

By means of short texts, film or art works this course explores such themes as the effect of technology on the political, the nature of democracy, the question of resistance through art and the role of violence in the social. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirement - Social Science
Breadth
 Requirement - Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

VIC114H1S | The Renaissance in Popular Culture

VIC114H1S
The Renaissance in Popular Culture
Professor Shaun Ross
W 12-2

From The Da Vinci Code to Assassin’s Creed, from Game of Thrones to the documentary series Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, representations of the Renaissance continue to capture and intrigue the popular imagination. This course explores these depictions of the Renaissance in a wide range of films, video games, television series, and novels. The focus will be on the exchange between screen, fiction, and ‘fact’, and on how the values and concerns of the present shape creative recreations of the past in popular culture. In addition to those mentioned above, this course will consider recent films and television series such as The Borgias, Wolf Hall, and The New World, as well as novels including The Moor’s Account and The Birth of Venus. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Exclusion - VIC114Y1
Distribution Requirement -
Humanities
Breadth
 Requirement - Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

VIC119H1F | Myths and Legends in Modern Contexts

VIC119H1F
Myths and Legends in Modern Contexts
Professor Cathie Sutton
R 10-12

This course provides an introduction to modern forms of ancient narratives, exploring the ways in which selected ancient literary sources and myths have been adapted to modern Canadian literature. Ancient narratives or 'old stories' are often reused, reinterpreted or reconstructed in modern narratives and given new relevance in a contemporary context. Students will encounter sources and contexts of ancient narratives. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirement - Humanities
Breadth
 Requirement - Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

VIC121H1F | Evaluating Healthcare: Problems and Solutions

VIC121H1F
Evaluating Healthcare: Problems and Solutions
Professor Matthew Mercuri
M 10-12

This course introduces students to the study of healthcare by asking foundational questions about how evidence and knowledge are produced in the context of healthcare problems. Students will explore how different frameworks for clinical practice (e.g. Evidence-based Medicine, Person-Centred Healthcare) conceptualize evidence and how different methodologies impact how healthcare research is conceived, reported, and understood. Students will learn to critically appraise healthcare research studies and assess their evidence value and implications for clinical practice. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirement - Social Science
Breadth
 Requirement - Living Things and Their Environment (4)

VIC122H1S | Scientific Evidence in Public Policy

VIC122H1S
Scientific Evidence in Public Policy
Professor Matthew Mercuri
M 10-12

This course investigates issues arising from the translation of scientific evidence for public consumption, including in the development of public policy and in confronting problems of social and global significance. Areas of focus will include climate change, global health and clinical medicine. Students will explore concepts including the perception and communication of risk, the generalizability of research findings, probabilistic and mechanistic thinking and the use and abuse of scientific authority and “expertise” in public discourse. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirement - Social Science
Breadth
 Requirement - Society and its Institutions (3)

VIC134H1S | Globalization

VIC134H1S 
Globalization
Professor Shirley Yeung
F 10-12

This interdisciplinary course explores the contemporary character of globalization. The world is shrinking as money, goods, people, ideas, weapons, and information flow across national boundaries. Some commentators assert that a more tightly interconnected world can exacerbate financial disruptions, worsen the gap between rich and poor nations, undermine democracy, imperil national cultures, harm the environment, and give unconstrained freedom to predatory corporations. Others proclaim that globalization - understood as capitalism and free markets - fosters economic growth, encourages creative collaboration, inspires technological breakthroughs, and enhances human prospects for a better life, in rich and poor countries alike, in unprecedented ways. Our task is to evaluate the evidence and draw our own conclusions. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)
VIC135H1F | The Death of Meaning

VIC135H1F
The Death of Meaning
Professor Andrew Lawless
T 11-1

This course examines some of the ways in which the idea that our lives have a transcendent (or higher) ‘Meaning’, or indeed any meaning at all, came under increasing scrutiny in the 19th and 20th centuries. It begins with an examination of how Darwin’s theory of evolution, according to which humans are not qualitatively different from the rest of the animal kingdom but rather, like them, simply products of evolution, challenged the longstanding idea of humans as ‘exceptional’ beings at the centre of a god’s creation or at least at the top of the ‘tree of life’. While Darwin did not draw an explicitly atheist conclusion from his findings, many others did. There thus ensued a debate about the meaning of life, or lack thereof, that continues to this day. We will examine this questioning of our place in the great scheme of things by reading and discussing a series of short ‘classic’ texts that range across science, politics, philosophy and literature. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirement - Humanities
Breadth
 Requirement - Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

VIC136H1F | How to Study Everyday Life: Media, Culture and Technology

VIC136H1F
How to Study Everyday Life: Media, Culture and Technology
Professor Ivan Kalmar
M 10-12

An introduction to the academic study of everyday media life. Increasingly, every aspect of our lives is mediated. We review different perspectives on how to study media life and pay particular attention to the platforms and apps that impact how we socialize, play, connect, and entertain ourselves. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirement - Social Science
Breadth
 Requirement - Society and its Institutions (3)

VIC137H1F | Science and Science Fiction

VIC137H1F
Science and Science Fiction
Professor Elizabeth Koester
M 1-3

In this course, we look at the relationship between science and race in science fiction from the early 20th-century to the present. Starting with Charles Chesnutt’s voodoo and ending with Ryan Coogler’s Black Panther, we examine how certain scientific discourses, including evolution and eugenics, have been used to marginalize and oppress certain people. Equally important to our course is the way that science fiction has remained a productive and prevalent genre for those very marginalized people critiquing their oppression. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirement - Social Science
Breadth
 Requirement - Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

VIC159H1S | Vic One Hundred Special Topics Seminar

VIC159H1S
Vic One Hundred Special Topics Seminar
Professor Mark Solovey
F 1-3

Topics vary from year to year. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities, Science, Social Science
VIC199H1S | The Secret Life of Objects: Analyzing the Culture of Things

VIC199H1S
The Secret Life of Objects: Analyzing the Culture of Things
Professor Cathie Sutton
R 10-12

This course will examine the materiality of objects with a view to understanding how artefacts are made, their circulation, consumption, and the importance of things to social and cultural life. An investigation of artefacts from various collections in and around the university will be undertaken to develop basic methods for the study, description and analysis of material culture. In addition to hands-on exploration of objects, topics may include antiquarians and their methods, material culture in colonial contexts, and materials in contemporary user-friendly design. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

How to Enrol

Priority will be given to Victoria College students at the beginning of course registration. Thereafter, Vic One Hundred/FYF seminars will be open to all first-year students in the Faculty of Arts & Science who are NOT enrolled in a college One program. Enrolment is limited to 1.0 FCE (full course equivalent). You may take a combination of Vic One Hundred and FYF seminar half-year courses as long as your enrolment in them does not exceed 1.0 FCE.

All Vic One Hundred Seminars satisfy the Victoria College Small-Course Requirement.

Contact

For more information, please contact vic.academics@utoronto.ca.